Korea Famous

5 07 2009

Last night we were hanging out in front of the local One Time (kind of like a 7-11, but with more choices of squid jerky) with some other foreigners enjoying some beer and the surprisingly pleasant weather. At some point a former student and his dad wandered by and dropped off a platter of dduk bo ki and some kim bap for no particular reason. A little while later a drunk businessman stumbled out of his car, and as he passed by our table slurred out a few words in English. We said something or other, he went inside, presumably to buy some very skinny cigarettes, and we went on with our evening. He came back a little while later and gave us ice cream shaped like sharks, dragged his poor wife (who didn’t speak any English) out of the car to visit with us (who don’t speak any Korean), and promised that if we ever had any trouble with the police, he could fix it for us. He also gave us a special Korean cure for hangovers, pictured below:

I've got wood.

I've got wood.

We’re Korea famous.

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Aaaaah, Brewskies

12 01 2009
A delicious and nutritious bevvie we call "My Other Lover."

A delicious and nutritious bevvie we call "My Other Lover."

It's good in bed, too.

It's good in bed, too.

These are oldies but goodies (greaties?) of our first homebrewed beer.  It was a stout and it was delicious and we miss it something awful.  We miss the rug we detroyed in the process of making this little darling, too.

Here’s a picture advertising the beer we have the most immediate access to here in Korea.  I’m pretty sure “Tok” means “pee-pee flavored.”

"Fresh" in this case means "made yesterday and has no possible chance of having any flavor."

"Fresh" in this case means "made yesterday and has no possible chance of having any flavor."





Lucky

10 01 2009

Feeding an Elephant, originally uploaded by Jake & Kristin.

Seven months ago today we arrived in Korea, full of trepidation, excitement, curiosity, and airline peanuts. We had no idea what to expect from the next day, let alone the next year, and certainly no idea we’d be feeding pineapples to pachyderms by New Year’s Eve.

Fortunately a nice Korean man met us at the airport and ignored our snoring and drooling as he drove us to our new home. Since then we’ve learned a thing or two, like how to teach, where to get Korean beer, why you shouldn’t get Korean beer, and how to not only spend this much time together without going crazy, but in fact enjoy it.

Korea hasn’t been our only teacher though. Over the winter break we visited Thailand. There we learned that elephants like to carry things around with their trunks while they’re hiking and wearing a backpack full of people. Our elephant leisurely munched her way through a six foot long banana tree in a few minutes. We found each slow bite through the crisp stem and gradually softer crunches as the elephant chewed to be rather soothing.

We still have seven months or so to go before we head back to the US. I wonder if the next seven will be as full as the first?